We used to have two things that comprised about a third of our recycling; yogurt containers and seltzer bottles. It drove me nuts. So I went out and got a yogurt maker – which I love and highly recommend for anyone who likes yogurt. (Get one with a timer that automatically shuts off.) But I didn’t know what to do about the seltzer situation. My husband loves it, it’s not unhealthy and it didn’t seem fair to ask him to give it up.

Then I heard about soda makers for the home and I thought what a great idea. On TreeHugger Pablo Paster, an Energy and Sustainability Management consultant at Hara Software, addresses just the topic I’ve been wondering about since I first heard about them. Are those soda makers you see in stores really greener than buying seltzer in bottles or cans? Here is what Pablo has to say about the topic.

Historically a Green Wall was used to describe a row of hedges or low growing trees that were used to form a border or boundary. Theses days, however, the term has taken on a whole new meaning.

Green Walls, also referred to as Living Walls and Vertical Gardens, are basically gardens that grow up rather than out. Up a previously built wall or a wall that was created specifically for thee purpose of planting.

Perusing the LandscapingNetwork.com‘s facebook page I saw what I thought was a particularly imaginative and well executed Green Wall. It was done by Blooming Desert Landscapes in Bend,Oregon.

Blooming Desert Landscapes' Green Wall

According to their facebook page it is made from old pallets. I love when recycling and great esthetics come together.

By now you obviously know of my passion for gardening. What you probably don’t know is in my former life I was a competitive skier. That’s right. 6 days a week on the hill 5 months a year. Dryland training in spring summer and fall, strength training cardio; if it was grueling we did it.

I was sponsored which meant I got all new equipment every year. My school, Carrabassett Valley Academy, did a good job of recycling our old stuff – giving it to the Special Olympics, selling it to raise money for school and community projects and just plain giving some away. But I am sure plenty got tossed in the bin.

On Grist, Joshua Zaffos writes about Greg Schneider who works for Snowsports Industries America.  These days Greg is hard at work to dealing with this situation in interesting ways. The article is here.

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